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Osteoware: Standardized Skeletal Documentation Software

Osteoware: Standardized Skeletal Documentation Software

Bodies3D by Richard Wright

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Bodies3D by Richard Wright, richwrig@tig.com.au.

The purpose of the software package is to represent bodies (of humans and of animals) as stick figures in a 3D space.

One use of the program (originally developed for forensic mapping) is to examine the pattern of distribution of bodies in mass graves. For example by rotating the bodies to a sideways view of a grave, it may be possible to discern partially separated heaps of bodies dumped by trucks.

Bodies3D is a freeware package, but with some minor copyrighted restrictions explained in the notes. Two programs are included in the package - Bodies3D.exe created by Richard Wright and Lines3D.exe created by Peter Bone.

The package Bodies3D.zip can be downloaded from:

https://app.box.com/shared/static/lpvstj4kz88na1xg92zk.zip

To use the program and notes, save the downloaded file Bodies3D.zip to a new directory (e.g. C:\Bodies3D). Unzip it there.

First read the advice in 'ReadMeFirst.pdf', and then 'Notes on Bodies3D.pdf'.

The program is compiled to run under Windows 32 and 64 bit. There is no Mac version as such, but the author has been told that Bodies3D works perfectly on a Mac running Windows via a Boot Camp partition, or 'Parallels Desktop 7'. He has not personally verified this.

The author suggests that you send him your email address, so that he can put you on a list for information about updates.

Edited by: kochertj on 06/02/2016 - 16:17
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From Richard Wright:

A year ago I made available a freeware package Bodies3D.  The purpose of the software is to represent bodies (of humans and of animals) as stick figures in a 3D space.

One use of the program (originally developed for forensic mapping) is to examine the pattern of distribution of bodies in mass graves. For example by rotating the bodies to a sideways view of a grave, it may be possible to discern partially separated heaps of bodies dumped by trucks.

The original notes briefly described how features other than relatively complete bodies could be added to the rotatable files. However on reflection I don't think that description was adequate.

I have therefore attached improved notes to the downloadable package.These notes describe in greater detail how to add body parts, lines marking a grave boundary, and artefacts such as bullets. The software itself is unaltered.